23 7 / 2014

slothilda:

Whenever I feel insecure about selfies.  

slothilda:

Whenever I feel insecure about selfies.  

10 7 / 2014

slaughterhouse90210:

“She’d been told often enough that she looked sad, even when she wasn’t. Catcallers had always tended to yell ‘Smile!’; there was just something gloomy about the downturn of her mouth and the size of her eyes.”—Emily Gould, Friendship

slaughterhouse90210:

“She’d been told often enough that she looked sad, even when she wasn’t. Catcallers had always tended to yell ‘Smile!’; there was just something gloomy about the downturn of her mouth and the size of her eyes.”
—Emily Gould, Friendship

09 7 / 2014

slaughterhouse90210:

“Wasn’t that, in the end, what he wanted? To discover how this place worked—not just its outward system of organization, but its inward, private one as well? Its secret machinations, the strings that gestured the puppet. Who was the puppet, though?”—Edan Lepucki, California

slaughterhouse90210:

“Wasn’t that, in the end, what he wanted? To discover how this place worked—not just its outward system of organization, but its inward, private one as well? Its secret machinations, the strings that gestured the puppet. Who was the puppet, though?”
—Edan Lepucki, California

08 7 / 2014

slaughterhouse90210:

“We don’t get to stay in moments and that should not be news to you. We are both familiar with the concept of time, the awful math of it, how our history always gets larger, less understandable, overweight, overworked, over and over, and memories get misfiled and complicate feelings for no good reason and some people seem more able to deal with this, to keep their histories clean and well ordered but I still don’t understand why we came unstuck from those moments we wanted to stay and why the moments we wanted to forget still haunt us.” —Catherine Lacey, Nobody Is Ever Missing

slaughterhouse90210:

“We don’t get to stay in moments and that should not be news to you. We are both familiar with the concept of time, the awful math of it, how our history always gets larger, less understandable, overweight, overworked, over and over, and memories get misfiled and complicate feelings for no good reason and some people seem more able to deal with this, to keep their histories clean and well ordered but I still don’t understand why we came unstuck from those moments we wanted to stay and why the moments we wanted to forget still haunt us.”
—Catherine Lacey, Nobody Is Ever Missing

07 7 / 2014

literaryjukebox:

Given the choice between the experience of pain and nothing, I would choose pain.

William Faulkner in The Wild Palms

Song: “Numb” by Sia

07 7 / 2014

literaryjukebox:

Only one mountain can know the core of another mountain.

Frida Kahlo (July 6, 1907–July 13, 1954) in The Diary of Frida Kahlo: An Intimate Self-Portrait

Song: “Magic Mountain” by Arthur & Yu

01 7 / 2014

slaughterhouse90210:

“A mother only does her children harm if she makes them the only concern of her life.”― W. Somerset Maugham, The Razor’s Edge

slaughterhouse90210:

“A mother only does her children harm if she makes them the only concern of her life.”
― W. Somerset Maugham,
The Razor’s Edge

30 6 / 2014

slaughterhouse90210:

“The abiding American myth of the self-made man comes attached to another article of faith—an insistence, even—that every self-made man can sustain whatever self he has managed to make. A man divided—thwarting or interrupting his own mechanisms of survival—fails to sustain this myth, disrupts our belief in the absolute efficacy of willpower, and in these failures often forfeits his right to our sympathy. Or so the logic goes. But I wonder why this fractured self shouldn’t warrant our compassion just as much as the self besieged? Or maybe even more?”—Leslie Jamison, The Empathy Exams

slaughterhouse90210:

“The abiding American myth of the self-made man comes attached to another article of faith—an insistence, even—that every self-made man can sustain whatever self he has managed to make. A man divided—thwarting or interrupting his own mechanisms of survival—fails to sustain this myth, disrupts our belief in the absolute efficacy of willpower, and in these failures often forfeits his right to our sympathy. Or so the logic goes. But I wonder why this fractured self shouldn’t warrant our compassion just as much as the self besieged? Or maybe even more?”
—Leslie Jamison, The Empathy Exams

29 6 / 2014

28 6 / 2014

leslieseuffert:

Edie Nadelhaft, Oh My God, 2014