slaughterhouse90210:

“What a frightening thing is the human, a mass of gauges and dials and registers, and we can only read a few and those perhaps not accurately.”—John Steinbeck, The Winter of Our Discontent

slaughterhouse90210:

“What a frightening thing is the human, a mass of gauges and dials and registers, and we can only read a few and those perhaps not accurately.”
—John Steinbeck, The Winter of Our Discontent

really-shit:

Photorealistic paintings by Lee Price

(Source: feeldesain.com)

(Source: popsonnet)

slaughterhouse90210:

"Some people you just had to embrace, in some way or another, had to bite into the muscle, to remain sane in their company. You needed to grab their hand and clutch it like a downer so they would pull you into their midst. Otherwise they, walking casually down the street towards you, almost about to wave, would leap over a wall and be gone for months.” ― Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient
 

slaughterhouse90210:

"Some people you just had to embrace, in some way or another, had to bite into the muscle, to remain sane in their company. You needed to grab their hand and clutch it like a downer so they would pull you into their midst. Otherwise they, walking casually down the street towards you, almost about to wave, would leap over a wall and be gone for months.”
― Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient

 

c-cassandra:

the camera loathes me!

c-cassandra:

the camera loathes me!

c-cassandra:

nope nope.. i give up!

slaughterhouse90210:

“Intelligent, thinking people could take things like this in their stride, just as they took the larger absurdities of deadly dull jobs in the city and deadly dull homes in the suburbs. Economic circumstances might force you to live in this environment, but the important thing was to keep from being contaminated. The important thing, always, was to remember who you were.” ― Richard Yates, Revolutionary Road

slaughterhouse90210:

“Intelligent, thinking people could take things like this in their stride, just as they took the larger absurdities of deadly dull jobs in the city and deadly dull homes in the suburbs. Economic circumstances might force you to live in this environment, but the important thing was to keep from being contaminated. The important thing, always, was to remember who you were.”
― Richard Yates, Revolutionary Road

trinketbaby:

Family portrait with Trigger’s two brothers

guardian:

"One male friend said that I couldn’t do it because my husband’s business partners would see, and one asked how my sons would feel when they grow up [they are seven and nine]. But both arguments were about the men in my life, and I thought they weren’t reason enough to stop me as an artist, a woman and a feminist."

United front: breasts without the airbrush »

Photos: Laura Dodsworth

(Source: theguardian.com)